Slashdot

Subscribe to Slashdot feed Slashdot
News for nerds, stuff that matters
Updated: 6 hours 37 min ago

'Is TikTok a Chinese Cambridge Analytica Data Bomb Waiting to Explode?'

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 3:34pm
CBS News calls TikTok "the first major contender since Snapchat to possibly disrupt a market dominated by social media behemoth Facebook. "The mere three-year-old startup even comes with a history of data-privacy controversies." Created by China start-up ByteDance in 2016, TikTok has already been downloaded over 1 billion times globally, surpassing both Facebook and Instagram in app installs last year, according to analytics site Sensor Tower.... It's also more than just a plucky tech start-up. ByteDance, which owns TikTok, is the single largest start-up in the world, surpassing Uber in valuation with $78 billion. It has funding from some of the world's highest-profile investors, including Japanese conglomerate SoftBank (also an investor in Uber). However, TikTok has already come under fire from government regulators and parents for data-privacy concerns and what some critics call predatory practices on the app regarding children. And additional concerns were raised this week by data rights advocate David Carroll, an associate professor of media design whose 2017 lawsuit against Cambridge Analytica indirectly led to a January criminal conviction of the administrators of Cambridge Analytica in the UK. If the cataclysmic scandal taught us anything, it was that some of the secrets of the data trade wars are buried in the fine print no one reads. In preparation for when my kids begin asking about the hugely popular lip-sync app TikTok, I dug into its privacy policy and its recent revisions. If you joined TikTok before 2019, what I found should worry you... Having learned the crucial lesson of data sovereignty through my experiences with Facebook's favorite democracy-destabilizing personality quiz, I'm now hyper-sensitized to the question of where our personal data ends up... I did the thing that almost no one does: I read their privacy policy. I was alarmed to see this section, which in late 2018 stated that TikTok user data may be transferred to China. This discovery leads him to one inevitable question. "Is TikTok a Chinese Cambridge Analytica data bomb waiting to explode?"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

After City Switched To a New Bodycam Vendor, Axon Threatened Its Credit Score

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 2:34pm
Long-time Slashdot reader v3rgEz shares an article from MuckRock: The deal Fontana Police Department struck with Axon sounded simple enough: a trial of five inexpensive body cameras and, for each of them, a Professional subscription to the company's cloud storage system. When the California city decided to use a different vendor years later, however, it found itself stuck continuing to pay $4,000 per year for an unused service. Exiting the contract, the department was told, could tarnish the city's credit rating -- even though the contract included a "termination for convenience" clause to avoid just that situation. A police department lieutenant tells the site that they ultimately spent over $8,000 for the cloud subscription which they'd already stopped using. (Last year Axon made $160 million from the recurring payments for its data-storage products.) The article also notes that Axon (the company formerly known as Taser, the stun gun manufacturers) now has "some form of customer relationship with 17,000 of the roughly 18,000 law enforcement agencies in the U.S., and it's actively working to grow its international customer base, making it one of the most ubiquitous providers of police technology."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

MongoDB Database Containing Over 275 Million Personal Records Exposed and Hacked

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 1:34pm
"An unprotected and public-facing MongoDB database containing over 275 million records of personal information on Indian citizens has been discovered on search engine Shodan," writes Slashdot reader helpfulhecker. BleepingComputer reports that the detailed personally identifiable information was exposed online for over two weeks: Security Discovery researcher Bob Diachenko discovered the publicly accessible MongoDB database hosted on Amazon AWS using Shodan, and as historical data provided by the platform showed, the huge cache of PII data was first indexed on April 23, 2019. As he found out after further investigation, the exposed data included information such as name, gender, date of birth, email, mobile phone number, education details, professional info (employer, employment history, skills, functional area), and current salary for each of the database records. While the unprotected MongoDB database leaked the sensitive information of hundreds of millions of Indians, Diachenko did not find any information that would link it to a specific owner. Additionally, the names of the data collections stored within the database suggested that the entire cache of resumes was collected "as part of a massive scraping operation" for unknown purposes. Two months ago Diachenko also helped uncover over 800 million exposed email addresses in another unprotected MongoDB database. And in January an investigation with TechCrunch also discovered millions of highly sensitive financial documents from tens of thousands of individuals who took out loans or mortgages. The same month Diachenko also discovered an exposed 854 gigabyte MongoDB database filled with resumes from over 200 million job-seekers in China.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Does Recycling Work?

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 12:34pm
"It's a complicated question," admits a New York sustainability advocate: If an item in a bin of recyclable materials is greasy, covered in food or, in the case of paper goods, soaking wet, the entire bin is typically rejected and sent to the landfill or incinerated... While we want to do the right thing, most of us don't know all the rules. Can you recycle that greasy pizza box? (No.) Plastic bottle caps? (It depends on the municipality.) Cereal boxes? (It depends.) The list of questions goes on... And many times it's difficult to find the correct answer. So, while we're throwing items in the recycling bin or diligently bringing them to a recycling center, we may be merely "wish-cycling" -- hoping that these items will somehow be recycled. Wish-cycled items eventually get sent to the landfill or clog recycling plant machinery... Remember -- Recycling is a business. Your recyclables are typically collected and processed by a private waste management company looking to make a profit. The materials are then assembled into massive bundles (bales) for sale. For many years, China was the main buyer of recyclable material. In 2018, however, China passed its National Sword policy that sets impossibly low contamination standards on 24 types of imported waste material. These new standards have caused a drastic decline in the market for recyclable materials. According to the New York Times, plastic scrap exports "valued at more than $300 million in 2015, totaled just $7.6 million in the first quarter of [2018], down 90% from a year earlier." What does all this mean? Facing increased prices to haul recyclables, some cities and towns have drastically scaled back or even stopped their services. And yes, you guessed it: bales of recyclable materials are ending up in landfills or being incinerated. The article urges readers to educate themselves about "how to recycle properly and responsibly," noting that currently only 9% of all plastic is ever recovered and recycled, so "over 90% is lost to the landfill, incinerated or, worst, pollutes our environment for hundreds of years." It also suggests reducing food waste, finding reusable alternatives to "single-use disposables" -- and re-purposing things rather than throwing them away in the first place.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IBM, Microsoft, and Red Hat CEOs Shared a Keynote at 15th Annual Red Hat Summit

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 12:04pm
An anonymous reader quote CRN: IBM chief executive Ginni Rometty and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella shared the keynote-session stage with Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst at the 15th-year installment of the open-source technology event. Rometty talked up IBM's pending $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat and their future relationship. Nadella was there to help herald Azure Red Hat OpenShift, the new enterprise-grade Kubernetes platform that allows developers to run container-based applications on-premises and across Azure, Microsoft's public cloud. Microsoft will jointly manage the platform with Red Hat. "The CEOs of (two of the) largest technology companies in the world on stage in the same keynote, and it's a Red Hat keynote," Whitehurst said. "Who would have expected that? Hopefully it says something about open source and our role, but it also certainly says something about those companies and their desire to serve customers and their desire to embrace open source." During the presentation Red Hat's CEO told Microsoft's CEO, "To be blunt, five years ago we had, I guess to be polite, it would be called an adversarial relationship." Earlier in the presentation, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella had said, "Everything has a time," adding later that the Red Hat/Microsoft partnership "is driven by what I believe is fundamentally what our customers expect of us. They expect us to...really interoperate, be committed to open source."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Red Hat Changes Logo After Customers Call It 'Sinister', 'Secretive'

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 11:34am
Red Hat's chief marketing officer discovered their logo was rendering poorly in digital formats (especially on small devices like smartphones). But then they discovered even bigger problems in surveys (including with potential customers) about what feelings the logo evoked: Sinister. Secretive. Evil. Sneaky. These respondents might not have known anything about Red Hat, but they did believe that man lurking in the shadows didn't immediately inspire their trust. In their survey responses, they wondered who he was and what he was doing in the logo.... Our iconic logo -- including the partially veiled, fedora-wearing "Shadowman," as we Red Hatters affectionately call him -- wasn't squaring with the values we firmly believed the logo stands for... When we decided to undertake an evolution of the Red Hat logo -- the first in nearly 20 years -- we set two guiding principles for ourselves. First, we'd do the work the Red Hat way, in the open. And second, we'd take this opportunity not just to improve our logo, but to make a bold statement about the ways Red Hat has evolved over its 26-year history... In December 2017, I announced our plans to update our look with a global invitation to collaborate. And since then, Red Hat's Brand team has been collecting feedback from customers and partners, coordinating work with well-known design consultancy Pentagram, poring over survey data, and iterating, iterating, iterating on the new design -- which we're now ready to unveil.... The new logo reflects Red Hat's evolution -- from a scrappy upstart "sneaking" into data centers with boxed copies of a Linux-based operating system (not to mention mugs and t-shirts) to the world's leading provider of open source solutions for enterprise hybrid cloud environments, someone working daily with the largest companies and agencies in the world to develop and run mission-critical solutions. We've truly stepped out of the shadows.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Is Bitcoin Becoming a Good Investment?

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 10:34am
The price of Bitcoin "is surging again," now up to more than $6000, writes Inc. columnist Eric Mack: In its decade-long history, the value of the pioneering cryptocurrency has actually followed a pretty reliable trajectory. That is to say, over the full term Bitcoin's value has only grown, much like many stocks, real estate and precious metals. It has seen dramatic run-ups in price followed by painful crashes, but it has consistently retained a significant portion of its previous gains each time it plummets. In other words, Bitcoin has reliably taken two steps forward and only one step back when it tanks. While the crypto captain lost roughly 75 percent of its value after peaking at a price of almost $20,000 per digital coin at the end of 2017, its lowest price from the last twelve months was still double where it stood in May of 2017. Now, that price point is up again by 75 percent from its bottom in January, leading many to wonder if another great run-up in price could already be underway. If that turns out to be the case, and Bitcoin follows its historic pattern of increasing in price by an order of magnitude, we could be looking at $100,000 per Bitcoin.... A few other factors support the idea that this latest Bitcoin recovery should be taken seriously. As CNBC reports, institutional investors have taken an increasing interest in cryptocurrencies... Of course, there's still plenty of naysayers, headlined by Warren Buffet, who continue to maintain that crypto is nothing more than the latest bubble. But if that's the case, how many times will it burst and refuse to die only to come back stronger? While $6,000 is well below the 2017 high price, it's worth noting that the first time Bitcoin crossed the $6,000 point was in October, 2017.That was only two months before tripling in price to reach its peak. So when cryptos get up a head of steam, they tend to trigger all sorts of FOMO and go "parabolic." A disclaimer at the bottom of the article notes that its author owns "a small amount of Bitcoin and a few other cryptocurrencies." "Can't wait to see what the next few months hold for Bitcoin," his article concludes, "and the slew of cryptos that tend to follow its price chart."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Uber and Lyft May Be Making Traffic Even Worse

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 9:00am
A new study published in the journal Science Advances suggests that, from 2010 to 2016, cars driving for the ride-sharing companies Uber and Lyft were making traffic worse in the San Francisco. The new findings echo those of another study of New York City. An anonymous reader shares a report from Science Magazine: A comparison of traffic speeds from 2010, before ride-sharing apps were widely used, with 2016 shows the time cars spent sitting in San Francisco traffic increased by 69%. To find out how much of that was caused by ride-sharing vehicles, researchers used [a computer model that simulated the speed of traffic with Uber and Lyft vehicles removed] to forecast what traffic might have been like in 2016 without Uber or Lyft. To do this, the authors needed to know how many additional cars Lyft and Uber were putting on the streets. When the companies refused to share this information, researchers used a program that had thousands of "ghost users" ping the Uber and Lyft apps every 5 seconds for 6 weeks in 2016, revealing the locations of nearby drivers -- and how many were on the streets at any given time. The model closely predicted the real-life traffic seen in 2010 and, after plugging in the Uber and Lyft driver data, 2016. The researchers then used the model to envision 2016 traffic minus the cars driving for Uber and Lyft. Without those cars, the model estimated just a 22% increase in traffic delays from 2010-16, suggesting ride-sharing companies were responsible for more than half of San Francisco's real-world traffic increase. The remainder of San Francisco's traffic increase was accounted for by growth in population and employment, which grew by roughly 70,000 people and 150,000 jobs respectively.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save a Patient With a 'Superbug' Infection

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 6:00am
reporter shares a report from NPR: For the first time, scientists have used genetically modified viruses to treat a patient fighting an antibiotic-resistant infection. Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway, 17, began the experimental treatment after doctors lost all hope. She was struggling with a life-threatening infection after a lung transplant. With the new treatment, she has not been completely cured. But the Faversham, England, teenager has recovered so much that she has resumed a near-normal life. The treatment involves a cocktail of three viruses known as "bacteriophages" that specifically attack the dangerous bacterium causing her infection. "These viruses have one specialty: they naturally infect bacteria," reports Live Science. "Once they do so, the viruses replicate inside the bacterial cell, and, through this replicative process, kill the bacterium." The downside with phages is that they're so specific to the bacteria they infect that a phage that works for one patient with a particular infection may not work for another patient infected with the same species of bacteria. The findings have been published in the journal Nature Medicine.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

28 Years Later, Hacker Fixes Rampant Slowdown of SNES' Gradius III

Sat, 05/11/2019 - 3:00am
Ars Technica's Kyle Orland reports that Brazilian ROM hacker Vitor Vilela has released a ROM patch for the hit arcade game Gradius III, creating a new, slowdown-free version of the game for play on SNES emulators and standard hardware. "In magazine screenshots, the game's huge, colorful sprites were a sight to behold, comparable to the 1989 arcade original," writes Orland. "In action, though, any scene with more than a handful of enemies would slow to a nearly unplayable crawl on the underpowered SNES hardware." From the report: The key to Vilela's efforts is the SA-1 chip, an enhancement co-processor that was found in some late-era SNES cartridges like Super Mario RPG and Kirby Super Star. Besides sporting a faster clock speed than the standard SNES CPU (up to 10.74 Mhz versus 3.58 Mhz for the CPU), SA-1 also opens up faster mathematical functions, improved graphics manipulation, and parallel processing capabilities for SNES programmers. The result, as is apparent in the comparison videos embedded here, is a version of Gradius III that Vilela says runs two to three times faster than the original. It also keeps its silky smooth frame rate no matter how many detailed, screen-filling sprites clutter the scene. That's even true in the game's notorious, bubble-filled Stage 2, which is transformed from a jittery slide show to an amazing showcase of the SNES' enhanced power. As if that wasn't enough, the patch even slashes the game's loading times, cutting a full 3.25 seconds from the notably slow startup animation. Vilela notes that the lack of slowdown "makes it incredibly super difficult" and even suggests that "some arcade segments of the game do not look RTA (real-time action) viable with SA-1. But we shouldn't underestimate the human capabilities."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

US Regulators Approve New Silicon Valley Stock Exchange

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 11:30pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: U.S. regulators on Friday approved a new stock exchange that is the brainchild of a Silicon Valley entrepreneur, a move that will give high-growth technology companies more options to list their shares outside of the traditional New York exchanges. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission approved the creation of the Long-Term Stock Exchange, or LTSE, a Silicon Valley-based national securities exchange promoting what it says is a unique approach to governance and voting rights, while reducing short-term pressures on public companies. The LTSE is a bid to build a stock exchange in the country's tech capital that appeals to hot startups, particularly those that are money-losing and want the luxury of focusing on long-term innovation even while trading in the glare of the public markets. The stock exchange was proposed to the SEC in November by technology entrepreneur, author and startup adviser Eric Ries, who has been working on the idea for years. He raised $19 million from venture capitalists to get his project off the ground, but approval from U.S. regulators was necessary to launch the exchange. The new exchange would have extra rules designed to encourage companies to focus on long-term innovation rather than the grind of quarterly earnings reports by asking companies to limit executive bonuses that award short-term accomplishments. It would also require more disclosure to investors about meeting key milestones and plans, and reward long-term shareholders by giving them more voting power the longer they hold the stock.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Don't Unionize, Buy Video Games,' Delta Airlines Employees Are Told

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 10:10pm
dryriver shares a report from the BBC: Delta Airlines is facing significant criticism after posters discouraging its staff from joining a union were widely shared online. "Union dues cost around $700 a year," one of the posters states. "A new video game system with the latest hits sounds like fun. Put your money towards that instead of paying dues to the union," it continued. The posters point to a website featuring Delta branding which encourages workers not to unionize. The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM), which claims to represent more than 110,000 airline employees in the United States, is attempting to organize union representation for 44,000 Delta employees. "Delta Airlines' all-out assault on their employees' legally-protected right to unionize with the Machinists Union is confirmation that our campaign to bring the benefits of IAM-representation is succeeding," it said in a statement. "The day when Delta ramp workers and flight attendants will finally be able to bargain for the compensation, benefits and work rules they deserve is coming quickly, and that has Delta terrified."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cats Rival Dogs In Many Tests of 'Social Intelligence'

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 9:30pm
sciencehabit writes: Scientists have been studying the social intelligence of dogs -- how they evolved to communicate and bond with us -- for more than two decades, but they've largely ignored cats. That has started to change. In the past five years, a number of laboratories exploring feline social cognition have popped up around the globe, revealing that cats rival dogs in many tests of social smarts. But cats are hard to work with -- they freak out in the laboratory and often don't cooperate even when researchers study them in their homes -- causing some to wonder whether studies of the feline mind will take off the same way they have for dogs. Oregon State University devised an "attachment test" where an owner and his/her cat will go into a room for a moment, and then the owner will leave. The cat will typically tend to freak out, meow a lot, and walk around in circles until the owner comes back. When the owner comes back and sits down on the ground, often the cat will come back to the owner. What's particularly interesting about this study is that the cat, after welcoming its owner and recognizing their presence, will then leave and start exploring the room. While the average person would assume that the cat doesn't care about their owner since they appear to just want to explore, it's the opposite that's true. The cat has such a close bond with their owner that they feel they're able to go explore now that their owner is there with them. They also do a similar test with a fan that has streamers attached to it. With the fan on making loud noise and freaking out the cat, the owner is instructed to "make nice" with the fan. After making sweet talk and touching the fan, some cats will start to calm down, approach the fan, and even lay down in front of it. The cats appear to pick up the emotional cues from their owners and learn that the fan is not something that they should be afraid of.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Intel Firmware Boot Verification Bypass Enables Low-Level Backdoors

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 8:50pm
itwbennett writes: At the Hack in the Box conference in Amsterdam this week, researchers Peter Bosch and Trammell Hudson presented a new attack against the Boot Guard feature of Intel's reference UEFI implementation, known as Tianocore. The attack, which can give an attacker full, persistent access, involves replacing a PC's SPI flash chip with one that contains rogue code, reports Lucian Constantin for CSO. "Even though such physical attacks require a targeted approach and will never be a widespread threat, they can pose a serious risk to businesses and users who have access to valuable information," writes Constantin. Intel has patches available for Tianocore, but as we all remember from the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities, distributing UEFI patches isn't an easy process.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Japanese Railway Company Starts Testing 249mph Bullet Train Speeds

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 8:10pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: This week, Japanese railway company JR East showed off its new Alfa-X, a high-speed bullet train that is designed to achieve a top speed of 400kph, or 249mph, which would make it the fastest commercial train in the world. In day-to-day operations, the train would shuttle passengers at 360kph, or roughly 224mph. On Friday, JR East will begin testing the Alfa-X, without passengers, on its railways. According to Bloomberg, the 10-car train will make the trip "between the cities of Aomori and Sendai at night" for the next three years during a testing phase. JR East hopes to use the Alfa-X commercially by 2030. Japan News says the line will eventually be extended to Sapporo. Bloomberg's report notes that there's a magnetically-levitated train in the works that may win the top-speed crown. It's been built between Tokyo and Nagoya and takes advantage of a tunnel-heavy route to achieve a top speed of 505kph (314mph). If all things go according to plan, it'll open in 2027.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Party City Closing 43 Stores As Helium Shortage Hurts Sales

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 7:30pm
The CEO of Party City cited a global helium shortage as he announced on Thursday that the retail chain will close 45 of its 870 stores this year. The shortage has been hitting party supply stores particularly hard for months, CNBC reported last month. Miami Herald reports: Party City CEO James Harrison said in February that the company was already missing its revenue "in large part due to helium supply pressures," according to CNBC, which reports that the company has experimented with "decorative air-filled balloons -- in lieu of the real thing. The company didn't say which stores will close this year. "The problem is, helium is being used up faster than it can be produced these days," Anders Bylund, an analyst at Motley Fool, said in an investing note. "Helium shortages fluctuate over time and across geographical markets, but anywhere between 50 and 200 of Party City's 850 stores don't have any helium in their tanks at any given time." Bylund added: "Helium may be the second most plentiful element in the universe, but it's also one of the lightest and doesn't form molecules easily with heavier atoms. Hence, the helium we use ends up floating into space, never to be seen again. There is no economically efficient way to manufacture the gas, so the bulk of the worldwide helium supply is a byproduct of natural gas extraction."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook's AI Algorithms Accused of Generating Terror Content

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 6:50pm
wiredmikey shares a report from SecurityWeek: Facebook is unwittingly auto-generating content for terror-linked groups that its artificial intelligence systems do not recognize as extremist, according to a complaint made public on Thursday. Researchers at the National Whistleblowers Center found that the Islamic State group and al-Qaeda were "openly" active on the social network and that Facebook was automatically creating "celebration" and "memories" videos for extremist pages that had amassed sufficient views or "likes." The Whistleblower's Center said it filed a complaint with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on behalf of a source that preferred to remain anonymous.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Google Launches Portal, an HTML Tag To Replace Iframe

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 6:10pm
An anonymous reader quotes a report from ZDNet: At the I/O 2019 developer conference earlier this week, Google launched a new technology called Portals that aims to provide a new way of loading and navigating through web pages. According to Google, Portals will work with the help of a new HTML tag named . This tag works similarly to classic tags, allowing web developers to embed remote content in their pages. Google says portals allow users to navigate inside the content they are embedding --something that iframes do not allow for security reasons. Furthermore, portals can also overwrite the main URL address bar, meaning they are useful as a navigation system, and more than embedding content -- the most common way in which iframes are used today. For example, engineers hope that when a user is navigating a news site, when they reach the bottom of a story, related links for other stories are embedded as portals, which the user can click and seamlessly transition to a new page. The advantage over using Portals over classic links is that the content inside portals can be pre-loaded while the user scrolls through a page, and be ready to expand into a new page without having the user wait for it to load. In a demo, you can see that Portals allow users to watch/listen to embedded content and then transition seamlessly to its origin page, where they could leave comments or open other media.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Brexit To Add to Europe's Woes in AI Race, Sweden's Borg Says

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 5:30pm
The loss of the U.K.'s financial power and expertise as a result of Brexit is likely to exacerbate the European Union's lag in the global technological arms race, according to Anders Borg, a former Swedish finance minister and senior adviser at artificial intelligence company Ipsoft. From a report: "Brexit entails several layers of problems," Borg said in an interview in Stockholm. "Technological development is being driven by the financial sector and, to a large extent, Europe's financial sector is London. So it's not the British financial system that is now being put on hold, it's Europe's." Britain is home to a third of artificial-intelligence startups in Europe, according to a report by MMC Ventures in association with Barclays, which dubs the country "the powerhouse" of European AI. Europe is already slipping behind China and the U.S., which invest much more in AI systems, Borg said. Another key issue involves 5G, which provides the additional bandwidth needed to carry the vast amounts of data necessary for AI development. The networks will form the "backbone" of the new digital economy, Borg said.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

'Unhackable' Encrypted Flash Drive eyeDisk Is, As It Happens, Hackable

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 4:51pm
According to the findings of Pen Test Partners, a U.K.-based cybersecurity firm, the "unhackable" eyeDisk, an allegedly secure USB flash drive that uses iris recognition to unlock and decrypt the device, is hackable. From a report: In its Kickstarter campaign last year, eyeDisk raised more than $21,000; it began shipping devices in March. There's just one problem: it's anything but "unhackable." Pen Test Partners researcher David Lodge found the device's backup password -- to access data in the event of device failure or a sudden eye-gouging accident -- could be easily obtained using a software tool able to sniff USB device traffic.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Pages